We will gather for the third time to learn something new, to socialize and to support the great cause of the Albert Szent-Györgyi Young Investigator Award, established by the Hungarian scientific diaspora.

Ambassador Ferenc Kumin, PhD

Consul General of Hungary

and

the New York Hungarian Scientific Society

requests the pleasure of your company 

At the 3rd Annual Fundraising Gala and Dinner of the New York Hungarian Scientific Society on Thursday, December 14th, 2017 at 6:30 p.m.

This will be a fantastic dinner event with a cause.

We will gather for the third time to learn something new, to socialize and to support the great cause of the Albert Szent-Györgyi Young Investigator Award, established by the Hungarian scientific diaspora.

Professor Bruce S. McEwen, Ph.D, Alfred E. Mirksy Professor of The Rockefeller University, member US National Academy of Sciences will give a lecture:

What is Stress and When Is Stress Good For You?

You will hear from the 2016 awardees of the Szent-Gyorgyi Albert Young Investigator Award about their recent achievements and the 2017 awardees, including the winner of the special, Gizella Solti Award will be announced.

Learn more about the Albert Szent-Györgyi Prize and about how can you support the NYHSS  at http://nymtt.org/

 Suggested donation: minimum 100 USD/seat!

Please note that at the event only cash and check donations will be accepted.

Dress code: black tie optional. 

Please R.S.V.P by December 12th to OGSaKaPiSrZJrcO4INYkcnN2cC5ueWZAbWZhLmdvdi5odQ==

with dietary restrictions

Venue: Consulate General of Hungary (227 East 52nd Street, New York City)

What is Stress and When Is Stress Good For You?

Bruce S. McEwen, Ph.D. – Rockefeller University

Bruce S. McEwen obtained his Ph.D. in Cell Biology in 1964 from The Rockefeller University.  He is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.  He served as President of the Society for Neuroscience in 1997-98.

Research contributions  His laboratory discovered adrenal steroid receptors in hippocampus and this provided a gateway to the ongoing discovery that circulating steroid hormones and other systemic mediators affect cognition, mood and many other neural processes and the further discovery that there is structural and functional plasticity of the adult as well as developing brain, which these hormones mediate.  Translational studies throughout the world are extending these findings to the human brain.  His laboratory has also led the way in demonstrating mechanisms of action of gonadal steroids throughout the entire brain, starting with the hippocampus, via both genomic and non-genomic mechanisms. 

Collaborative transdisciplinary research: He served on the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Socioeconomic Status and Health, in which he has helped to reformulate concepts and measurements related to stress and stress hormones in the context of human societies, which led to the concept of “allostatic load and overload”.  He is now a member of the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child which focuses on biological embedding of early life experiences and promoting healthy brain development.  He is the co-author of a book with science writer, Elizabeth Lasley, for a lay audience called “The End of Stress as We Know It”, published in 2002, and “The Hostage Brain” with science writer, the late Harold M. Schmeck, Jr., published in 1994, both of which are now available as eBooks. http://lab.rockefeller.edu/mcewen/

Abstract:

Stress pervades our lives. We become anxious when we hear of violence, chaos or discord. And, in our relatively secure world, the pace of life and its demands often lead us to feel that there is too much to do in too little time. This disrupts our natural biological rhythms and encourages unhealthy behaviors, such as eating too much of the wrong things, neglecting exercise and missing out on sleep.  Hormones like cortisol and adrenalin and the metabolic and immune systems react to a changing world  and help us adapt (“allostasis”) but these same systems accelerate disease processes when overused or dysregulated amongst themselves, as also in the case as a result of health damaging behaviors (“allostatic load/overload”).  The brain is the central organ of stress and the ability to adapt to stress because it perceives and determines what is threatening as well as the behavioral and physiological responses to a changing world. Brain circuits change and adapt under stress and recovery but can also "get stuck" and then need external interventions, as in anxiety and depressive disorders.  There are important sex differences in how the brain responds to stressors that are in urgent need of further exploration.  Moreover, adverse early life experiences, interacting with varients  (alleles) of certain genes, produce lasting effects on brain and body via epigenetic mechanisms.   While prevention is most important, the plasticity of the brain gives hope for therapies that take into consideration brain-body interactions.